Market Commentary

Is the Stock Market Too Concentrated?

January 17th, 2022
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For the last 5 years, S&P 500 performance has been driven by a few huge companies … but that dominance could be changing.

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What Does 2021’s Market Volatility Mean for 2022?

January 10th, 2022
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Last year certainly had plenty of twists and turns, but the stock market as a whole delivered solid performance.

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3 Economic and Market Positives for 2022

January 4th, 2022
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The overall sentiment among investors is more negative than positive, but Mitch sees reasons to be optimistic.

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Are We Returning to 1970s-Style Inflation?

December 28th, 2021
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As the inflation rate rises, comparisons to the ’70s and ‘stagflation’ are emerging. Mitch offers his expert view.

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Should Diminished Consumer Confidence Make You Bullish?

December 27th, 2021
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Jobs, spending and household savings are positive, but consumers aren’t very happy. That could help keep the bull market going.

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How Will the Fed’s Shifting Message Impact Markets?

December 13th, 2021
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Mitch offers his take on the popular opinion is that an accelerated taper timeline and possible rate hikes are bad for the market.

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Supply Chains Improve, But Does Anyone Notice?

December 5th, 2021
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Supply chain problems appear to be easing, but investors don’t seem to notice—and that could be good news for stocks.

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3 Key Narratives Adding to Economic “Wall of Worry”

November 29th, 2021
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Demand is strong, the job market is wide open, and corporate profits are at record highs—so why are people so worried?

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How Will New Infrastructure Spending Affect the Markets?

November 22nd, 2021
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Mitch expects the $1 trillion infrastructure law to have a muted, but overall positive impact on the economy and markets

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Why Bold Market Predictions Rarely Pan Out

November 14th, 2021
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Every so often, someone generates headlines with an outrageous prediction … but they’re almost always wrong.

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